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Posts Tagged ‘fun facts’


My nieces love going into Central Park in New York City or out in the yard in the Hamptons and digging for worms. Not exactly my cup ‘o tea digging for worms, BUT its very entertaining for the kids and can be educational too! With summer here and in need of afternoon activities, why not dig for worms with your kids? Here are some fun facts: 

  • A worm has no eyes, legs or arms.
  • There are 2700 different types of earthworms in the world.
  • There can be up to 1 MILLION earthworms in just 1 acre of land.
  • 22 foot long earthworm was found in South Africa.
  • Worms help plants by mixing the soil. So gardeners love them because they are ‘free’ help!
  • Even without eyes, a worm can still sense light and will move away from it.
  • Earthworms come to the surface when it rains because they need oxygen to breathe, and they would drown if they stayed in the soil.
  • Regular earthworms can live 15 years.
  • Although native to Europe, earthworms are found throughout North America and western Asia. They do not live in deserts or regions where there is permafrost or permanent snow and ice.
  • They are often called night crawlers because they are often seen feeding above ground at night. Said to be shy of the light, they burrow during the day and stay close to the surface, but they can dig down in the soil as deep as 6.5 feet (2 meters).
  • The worm’s first segment contains its mouth. As they burrow, they consume soil, extracting nutrients from decomposing organic matter like leaves and roots. Earthworms are vital to soil health and to plants growing in it because they transport nutrients and minerals from below to the surface via their waste.
  • As they move through the soil, their tunnels aerate the ground. An earthworm can eat up to one third its body weight in a day. That would be equal to a 75-pound (34.1-kilogram) youngster eating 25 pounds (11.4 kilograms) of food in one day!
  • Earthworms are a source of food for numerous animals, like birds, rats, and toads, and are frequently used in composting and as bait in commercial and recreational fishing. Their numbers are strong throughout their range—they’re even considered agricultural pests in some areas—and they have no special status.
  • Earthworms are invertebrates—they don’t have an internal skeleton made of bone.
  • There isn’t a fossil record of earthworms because they are soft-bodied invertebrates.
  • Most earthworms will live for about six years in the wild.
  • Many people believe that if a worm is cut in half, the two pieces will grow into full-size worms. This is not true.

 CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S PLAYWEAR AT
www.letop-usa.com

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This week we travelled to Lewes, Delaware to interview one of the cutest children’s boutiques we know – Kids’ Ketch! Owner, Teresa Ford, gave us the inside scoop on what “ketch” means in sailing, their upcoming event for the Italian Fun Fest, back-to-school trends, the fabulous local hangouts for families, and a fun tidbit to leave in your kiddo’s paper bag lunch to make their day! Read more and discover fun facts about Kids’ Ketch boutique!

KIDS’ KETCH
132 Second Street
Lewes, DE 19958
302.645.8448

or go to www.kidsketch.com for more information

CHECK-IN and JOIN Kids’ Ketch Facebook page and click HERE

1.    What is the inspiration behind your store’s name? Give us 3 fun facts about your store that a typical customer wouldn’t know.
Teresa:
We are located where the Delaware Bay meets the Atlantic Ocean, so I wanted to have a name related to the sea and to children. A “ketch” is a two-masted sailboat and when I combined that with “kids” I liked the sound of it.  As for 3 fun facts a typical customer wouldn’t know:

  1. We started as a small store in 1990 with just 450 sq. ft.  After two moves, we are in our spot today, with 3,700 sq. ft, which is the only way a lot of people have ever seen us. We’ve been in this location since 1998.
  2. My two children have both worked here, my son still does, my mother who is 90 years old continues to work here, and my two nieces have worked here. So it has really been a family affair.
  3. We have a large fish tank in our store that the children love, and my husband, who is the mayor in this town, takes care of it. When people ask who takes care of our fish tank, we tell them “The Mayor does!”

2.    Tell us the inside scoop about any special events that you have planned at your store this  summer, especially the fun deals we can expect.
Teresa: 
On Friday, September 23rd, our downtown businesses are having an Italian Fun Fest where the street will be closed to cars, and we will celebrate all things Italian. In our store, we will feature Quercetti toys, which are made in Italy. We’ll raffle off a Bocce set, and have a fountain set up in the street where kids can make a wish and throw in a coin. The proceeds will benefit the Food Bank of Delaware.

(left to right) Teresa Ford, store owner, Mayor Jim Ford, Drew Laroche, and Karin Evick, store manager, celebrating the Best of Delaware award for children's clothing store in 2010.


3.   
Back-to-school is just around the corner – what are 3 trends you can tell parents to look for when buying their kids’ wardrobe?
Teresa: 
Back-to-school trends I love are:

  • The deep rich colors and mix of textures this fall
  • The mix of prints, especially in girls clothes that have cute tops and dresses, with leggings of a coordinating different print
  • Appliquéd flowers that create a 3-dimensional look on garments

4.    Tell us…before you “had kids or grandkids, what is one thing you swore you’d never…?”
Please share!
Teresa: 
One thing I swore I would not do is spoil kids or grandkids by giving them too much from my store.  All I needed to do was think of the kids that don’t have much, and realize that kids can get by with less than you think. I think I followed that rule with my children, but I don’t have grandchildren yet, and I bet that will be more difficult! 

5.    If you could pick one item to pack in a paper bag lunch for your kid, what would it be?
Teresa: 
The one item I would put in a paper bay lunch is a note or funny picture that would make them smile.

6.    Give us your must-have essential for a boy and a girl’s back-to-school wardrobe from your store.
Teresa: 
A must-have essential is a vibrant, colourful tunic top with fun contrasting leggings.

7.    Describe the neighborhood of your store location in Lewes, Delaware. Did you grow up in
any of the local area?
Teresa: 
Our store is located on an old-fashioned “main street” with small boutiques and restaurants. Shoppers often see their friends and neighbours while strolling the area. The town was founded in 1631, so many of the buildings are historic architecture. One block over is the canal where many boats are docked, and walk a couple more blocks and you’re at the beach! 

8.    Tell us about a “special” moment that made your day working at your store.
Teresa: 
The special moments that come to mind are when I get to interact with the children and they let their guard down and allow me into their world. This often happens when they are playing in our play area that has a train table and kitchen set up, or when they let me teach them a new game they enjoy playing. Special events allow us to interact with the kids more than usual, and I  guess it’s my latent “school teacher” genes I inherited from my mother that make it so much fun.

 9.    Where are the best/essential family hangouts and places to go around your store location?
Teresa: 
The best place to go – the Beach! We have the best beaches here, plus the Cape Henlopen State Park with it’s rolling sand dunes. We  have a wonderful Canalfront Park with playground, and the best places to get ice cream – like Kings Homemade Ice Cream, the Dairy Queen, and Two Dips.

Le Top "Cute Cookie" Corduroy Dress & Footless Stripe Tights

10.    What Le Top or rabbitmoon Fall 2011 collection is your store’s favorite and why?
Teresa: My favorite Fall 2011 Collection – Cute Cookie by Le Top for its vibrant colors, mixture of textures, and easy-to-wear styles.

KIDS’ KETCH
132 Second Street
Lewes, DE 19958
302.645.8448

or go to
www.kidsketch.com
for more information

 CHECK-IN and JOIN
Kids’ Ketch Facebook page
and click HERE

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I am in Africa right now on a safari in Botswana. I feel so fortunate to travel to such an exotic location with beautiful animals and new experiences that I never dreamed of having! Before leaving for my trip, I tried to research the common phrase of “The Big Five” and what animals these entail that I would see on my trip. The more I think about it, you don’t have to travel far to see your own “Big Five” at your local zoo and make it a learning experience for your children.

“The Big 5” refers to African: lion, leopard, rhino, elephant, and Cape buffalo.  You might ask, “Why not the hippo, gorilla or giraffe?” They are all just as big and exciting or even something as fast as the cheetah? I discovered the term “big five” was actually coined by big game hunters (not safari tour operators). It refers to the difficulty in bagging these large animals, mostly due to their ferocity when being hunted in the past. Now, safari tour operators use the phrase “big give” and turned it into a marketing term.

Fun Big Five Facts

The African Elephant:

  • An elephant’s trunk is the fusion of its upper lip and nose, it has more than 40,000 muscles
  • An elephant calf often sucks its trunk for comfort
  • Elephants prefer one tusk over the other, just as people are either left or right-handed
  • Elephants use their trunk as a snorkel when swimming
  • Elephants waive their trunks up in the air and from side to side to smell better
  • An elephants’ skin is an inch thick
  • Elephants flap their ears to keep cool
  • Elephants spend up to 16-18 hours per day eating
  • Elephants’ tusks grow throughout their lives
  • Elephants use their feet to listen. They pick up sub-sonic rumblings made by other elephants through vibrations in the ground.

The Lion:

  • Lions rest around 20 hours a day
  • Lion cubs are born with spots (rosettes)
  • The size and coloration of a lion’s mane shows other males how fit and strong he is, the darker and larger the mane, the stronger the lion is
  • Lions do not purr like house cats
  • All lion tails end in a hairy tuft that develops when a cub is around 5 months old
  • All lions can climb trees, some rest up high more than others in certain areas to avoid buffalo and tsetse flies
  • Lions do not like to swim
  • As lion cubs get older, they nurse from any lactating female in their pride
  • Lions can differentiate between the roars of large groups and those of small groups and those of strangers from companions.
  • Male lions mark their territory by spraying a combination of urine and scent from glands at the base of their tails

The Leopard:

  • Leopards can kill prey larger than themselves
  • Leopards purr
  • Leopards are excellent swimmers
  • A leopard’s spots are in fact irregular circles called “rosettes”
  • A leopard stalks and pounces its prey, rather than chase it long distances
  • A leopard with no spots and a black coat is called a panther
  • A leopard cub begins to hunt with its mother at around 4-5 months old
  • The leopards’ spots are circular in East African but square in southern Africa
  • Leopards can jump 10 feet (3 m) straight up
  • White spots on the tip of their tails and back of their ears help leopards locate and communicate with each other in tall grass

The Rhino:

  • South Africa is home to more than 80% of Africa’s rhino population
  • The white rhino’s name derives from the Dutch “weit,” meaning wide, a reference to its wide, square muzzle adapted for grazing
  • Rhinos have three toes on each foot
  • A group of rhinos is called a crash
  • Oxpeckers eat the ticks off a rhino’s hide and also warn of danger
  • A charging rhino can reach speeds of 35 mph
  • A rhino’s horn is made of thick matted hair
  • Man is the rhino’s only natural predator
  • Rhino’s have roamed the earth for more than 50 million years
  • Female rhinos are pregnant for 15-16 months

The Cape Buffalo:

  • Buffalo will protect their calves by pushing them into the middle of the herd when danger lurks
  • Buffalo will mob a predator, especially if there’s a calf calling for help
  • Buffalo mate and give birth during the rainy season only
  • Cape Buffalo have never been domesticated
  • M’bogo is the (Ki)Swahili word for Cape Buffalo.
  • The ox-pecker bird keeps the Cape Buffalo clean by eating all the parasites that live in its thick hide
  • The Cape Buffalo can run at speeds of 35 mph

Check out some of Le Top’s animal themed clothing for your little one HERE!

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Heard the phrase, “An apple a day keeps the doctor away?” Curious about where it came from? The credit goes to Wales (though it’s known as an English adage). The original proverb, printed in 1866, goes: “Eat an apple on going to bed, and you’ll keep the doctor from earning his bread.” With winter here and it being apple season, I thought about, “What does the apple nutritionally give us and our kids?” So I did some research for you (and for me) about nutritional facts, fun facts and the history of the apple.  

10 Core Facts about Apples
Apples are a very good fruit for building strong and healthy bodies. A medium-sized apple is:

  1. Fat-free: May help reduce the risk of some types of cancers
  2. Saturated-fat free
  3. Sodium-free: May help reduce the risk of high blood pressure
  4. Contains natural sugars called fructose
  5. Has only 80 calories: Helps you maintain a healthy weight.
  6. Cholesterol-free: Helps keep your heart healthy and may help protect against cardiovascular disease.
  7. Contains no artificial colors or flavors
  8. An excellent source of fiber and Vitamin C: Helps reduce blood cholesterol, and aids digestion. They also contain potassium, antioxidants, iron, calcium and Vitamin A. One apple has five grams of fiber.
  9. A handy, satisfying snack: You can take one with you anywhere.
  10. An easy way to get your recommended five servings of fruits and vegetables daily!
  11. A medium apple is about 80 calories.

Did you know?…Apple Facts:

  • To make a traditional 9-inch apple pie, you’ll need 2 pounds of apples.
  • Worldwide, a remarkable 7,500 varieties of apples are grown.
  • In the United States, a hearty 2,500 varieties can be found; though only 100 are grown for commercial purposes. The only apple native to North America is the Crabapple.
  • Out of the 100 apple varieties grown, 15 comprise 90% of total production: Red Delicious, Gala, Golden Delicious, Granny Smith, and Fuji lead the way.
  • An average of 65 apples per person are consumed in America each year. 


  • Apple trees can grow up to 40 feet high; though many orchards have dwarf trees for easier picking.
  • The first apple nursery opened in 1730; the location was Flushing, New York.
  • A peck of apples is 1/4 a bushel and weighs approximately 10.5 pounds.
  • A bushel weighs 42 pounds.
  • A bushel of apples can produce 20-24 quarts of applesauce.
  • At room temperature, an apple will ripen 6-10 times faster than in the refrigerator.
  • The state fruit of New York is the apple
  • The state flower of Michigan is the apple blossom
  • Apples can be as small as a cherry or as large as a grapefruit
  • Apple trees don’t grow from seeds — they are grafted or budded
  • Apple trees can live to be 100 years old
  • Most apples have only five seeds, but some may have as many as 10 and others may have no seeds at all
  • Sixty-one percent of apples are eaten fresh and 39 percent are processed into juice and sauce
  • Apples come in all shades of reds, greens, and yellows.
  • The pilgrims planted the first United States apple trees in the Massachusetts Bay Colony.
  • The science of apple growing is called pomology.
  • 25 percent of an apple’s volume is air. That is why they float.
  • The largest apple picked weighed three pounds.

Apple History
Originating somewhere between the Caspian and Black Seas, apples today are grown all over the world — from China to Italy to the United States. As long as 3,000 years ago, apples were playing an important part in people’s lives.

Folklore has it that an ancient Greek who wanted to propose to a woman would only have to toss her an apple. If she caught it, he knew she had accepted his offer. And newlyweds in the 7th century B.C. shared an apple as a symbol of a fruitful union.

European settlers to America brought with them their favorite fruits, which were much favored over the native crab apple. The colonists used apples to eat and also to make into apple cider, apple vinegar and hard cider. As the early colonists explored the frontier and moved from the eastern United States to the west, so did the apple. Now the apple is grown commercially in 36 states.

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It’s fun, it’s cute, it’s high quality…and no returns!”
– Lori Clarke, Owner of Tot to Teen Village boutique (on why she loves Le Top)

1.      What is one special or fun fact about your store that a typical customer wouldn’t know?
Lori: We’ve been in business for 74 years, and owned now by a third generation.

2.      Describe the neighborhood of Kalamazoo, Michigan where your store is located. The name has a great ring to it! Can you name 3 fun facts about your town your store is located in?
Lori: 
Fact #1) President Obama came to our town in June for one of our local school’s graduation because our state offers free college tuition for graduating students to Michigan schools.

Fact #2) The baseball player Derek Jeter was raised in Kalamazoo.

Fact #3) We have lots of lakes for fishing, boating, and water sports.

3.      What sets you apart as a successful children’s store?
Lori: We offer items that people cannot find at your typical stores. We’re unique!

4.      Where did the name Tot to Teen Village come from?
Lori: The owner designed the inside of the store to reflect different parts of the U.S.A.

5.      Back to school is here – what has been flying off the shelves and this fall’s “must-have”?
Lori: For girls, it is anything purple and “fru-fru.”

6.      Tell us about the school lunches your mom or dad made for you when you were a kid? What would someone find inside your brown paper bag or tin lunch box?
Lori: I seldom took my lunches to school as a child – our cafeteria food was pretty good. If I did take a lunch, it was always a bologna sandwich with Miracle Whip and a Hostess Twinkie…and no fruit because I hate fruit.

7.      What tip would you give to a parent dressing a child for fall? Any hot trends?
Lori: Don’t fight with them! Let them be comfortable, and buy easy-to-care-for items (merchandise). That way, everyday dressing is easier.

8.      If you had one piece of advice for someone trying to break into children’s retail, what would it be?
Lori: Are you insane? Actually I would say: You can’t be everything, so pick a niche and do it well.

9.      What is your best or most memorable moment in your store?
Lori: Finding out I was having a granddaughter, and going crazy buying clothes for her! (my “bring-me-home” I bought was of course Le Top.)

10.      What collection or piece from Le Top or Le Top Baby line do you love from the Fall/Holiday 2010 collection?
Lori: My favorites are the Le Top baby Pretty Rosebuds collection and Lavender’s Blue.

Tot to Teen Village
229 W. Kilgore Rd.
Kalamazoo, MI 49002
(269) 381-7800
www.tottoteenvillage.com

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This little Le Top piggy went to market to interview one of our favorite premier store retailers for this Friday’s “Store Spotlight” – Tiny Toes.  Boutique mother, Tina Lewis and daughter, Karen Jacobs, tell us about working as a mother and daughter duo business, what Karen packed away in her lunch (and what melted), and what’s hot from the Le Top Fall 2010 collection.

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1.     Where did the name Tiny Toes come from?
Karen: A mother and grandmother’s “mild” obsession with my sons little toes. 🙂

2.     How long have you been working as mother and daughter duo in the business? How would you describe the benefits of “keeping the business in the family”?
Karen: We started the store together just over 4 years ago and are still going strong.  We love helping new moms select all the gear and goodies for their new arrivals–particularly when they come shopping with their moms.  We each bring something different to the table, whether it is a different perspective on what moms versus grandmoms like to buy or our skills in merchandising versus marketing. 

3.     What is one special or fun fact about your store that a typical customer wouldn’t know?
Karen: Our fixture system came from IKEA, so by the time we opened our doors we had assembled a collection of over 200 Allen wrenches.  We still have them should you ever find yourself in need of one.

4.     What sets you apart as a successful children’s store?
Karen: We really make an effort to get to know our customers. We work hard to remember things like grandchildren’s sizes, who loves which brands, what outfits have already been purchased by other family members and more.  We have wonderful customers and we really enjoy going the extra mile to make their shopping experience special and fun.

5.     Describe the neighborhood of Bel Air, Maryland where your store is located.
Karen: Bel Air is a sleeper suburb of Baltimore. We’re a bit in the country, but with great access to both Baltimore and Philadelphia. Our store is located on a historic main street with lots of other independent shops.  The area is continuing to grow and expand and we have been very fortunate to be part of this growth.

6.     Back to school is here – do you remember what you wanted to wear on your first day of school or a childhood memory of your first day at school? Can you share a picture of how your mother dressed you when you were a child?
Karen: Per my mom–a yellow polly flinders dress–I hope the photos have all gone missing 🙂

7.      Tell us about the school lunches your mom or dad made for you when you were a kid? What would someone find inside your brown paper bag?
Karen: One time in kindergarten we were given ice cream for a special treat.  I couldn’t finish mine, so I packed it back up in my lunchbox and brought it home for later. You can only imagine the mess mom found when she opened that lunch box.

8.     What tip would you give to a parent dressing a child for fall? Any hot trends?
Karen:
We love separates for back-to-school time. September can still be hot, so we love to find short sleeve tees, tops and dresses that will work for a great “fall” back to school photo but that can be layered later on and worn throughout the fall and winter season.  And we’re always on the look out for lines that bridge the gap between comfort (number one priority for the pre-school set) and fashion.

9.     If you had one piece of advice for someone trying to break into children’s retail, what would it be?
Karen: Ask tons of questions-of your sales reps, other store owners, other businesses in your area.  It’s amazing what you can learn from others experience.  Once you are open ask those questions of your customers–they continue to be our best source of information on what will work in our store.

10.     What is your best or most memorable moment in your store?
Karen:
We have a photo board in our store where customers post pictures of their children in Tiny Toe’s outfits.  We love seeing the children who we dressed for coming home (from the hospital) now come in shopping for pre-school outfits. Having a small part in creating special memories for those families is one of our favorite parts of the job.

11.     What collection or piece from Le Top or Le Top Baby line do you love from the Fall/Holiday 2010 collection?
Karen: The Pocket Full of Posies dress with tights and coordinating cardigan.

Le Top Pocket Full of Posies ensemble

Tiny Toes
4 North Main Street
Bel Air, MD 21014
410.420.6727
http://www.shoptinytoes.com

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This past week my boyfriend’s sister went out of town on vacation and I gladly volunteered to babysit sweet Ella for a day.  How to describe my day?  An adventure!  It was such a lovely day of babysitting that I have decided to break it up into 2 parts of “highlights” – a la ESPN “Sports Highlights,” of my day with Ella (my star player)! 

Ella gets up-close-and-personal with a butterfly and a curator at Silly Science Class

7:15am:  Our morning started with dolly-yoga time where we lined up about 10 of her Barbie dolls and used them as examples of how to perform various poses in yoga with their legs and arms!  We talked about stretching and how that improves your pose and demonstrated by showing how a body stretches with the doll legs and arms, and then making their bodies align “perfect(ly)” into a yoga pose.  The two poses that I proudly was able to teach Ella was Downward Facing Dog and Chaturanga. In my opinion, children can benefit enormously from yoga.  Physically, it enhances their flexibility, strength, and coordination. In addition, their concentration and sense of calmness and relaxation improves.  Many child physicians think that doing yoga helps children to connect more deeply with the inner self.

8:15am:  Ella grew bored with her yoga stretching and we moved onto a new game of follow the leader!  In my opinion, it was more like an exercise boot camp where we ran from one side of the house to the other with various obstacles such as jumping like bunnies, a somersault tumble, touching the ground and ending right back at the front door.  Who knew that I would get my 45-minute exercise for the day!

9:00am: We then decided to browse her already extensive library of children’s books.  She pulled out one of her favorite books about the jungle.  We talked about how Bobbie and Papi (her Grandparents) went on an African safari to see the lions and rhinos!  Ella’s response was, “Uncle Sam, Melissa and Ella should go to Africa! We can take the train! Or maybe a TAXI!”   I winked at Ella and let her know she is a seasoned New York City taxi girl and I might just have to hint to Uncle Sam about this suggestion of a safari together! Ha!…we took a picture next to the rhinos in the American Museum of Natural History later that afternoon. (Kinda blurry photo, but it was cute anyhow!)

9:20am: The decorator arrived to deliver beautiful new red lamps that were wrapped with big bubble wrap. Lesson learned?  Bubble wrap can be a great 20-25 minute activity for any child by unraveling the bubble wrap and creating a runner in the living room!  We practiced hopping like a bunny, while making the bubbles pop!  Pop, pop, pop = FUN!

10:15am-11:15am: Time for Silly Science Class.  We raced over to New York City’s American Museum of Natural History from her apartment and attended her “Silly Science” class where we went to see the new tropical butterfly conservatory exhibit.   What a treat!  It was VERY humid in the conservatory (note to self to not wear your jacket inside the room!), however the heat was nothing compared to the excitement when Ella saw all kinds of butterflies.  I feel confident that she walked out with a wealth of knowledge and a little more love for them and their beauty. Ella channeled her inner Annie Leibovitz and took many pictures with my digital camera.  I was fascinated by the concept of her perspective through the lens of a camera.  See Ella’s below gallery of images and ‘fun facts’ we learned together about butterflies and moths:

1.  What’s the difference between a butterfly and a moth? 
There are many differences. Adult butterflies are active in the day, while most—but not all—moths are active at night. When resting, a butterfly holds its wings together above its back; a moth holds its wings down.

Go to this link to see the Museum’s live butterfly cam: http://www.amnh.org/exhibitions/butterflies/cams.php

2.  Do butterflies have a tongue and how do they eat? Butterflies can taste! They have “taste buds” at the end of the tongue, which looks like a long antenna.

3.  Do butterflies sleep? 
At night or when the day is cloudy, butterflies rest by hanging upside down from leaves or twigs, where they are hidden in the leaves. Unfortunately we don’t know whether or not they are sleeping.

4.  What makes butterfly wings colorful? Butterfly wings are covered with tiny scales that each has a single color. Most of the colors are produced by pigments, but the beautiful iridescence of some butterflies come from reflective structures on the scale’s surface.

Ella captured a photo of a black and white butterfly feeding on sugar syrup in a "feeder" in the butterfly conservatory (not too bad, right?)

Ella looked up and took this image of butterflies and moths flying around the light and "feeders".

Photo of housed and hibernating butterfly cocoons (known as pupas). If you look close there is one butterfly hatching out of the cocoon.

Ella captured a total of 4 butterflies and moths in this picture. Can you find them?

Ella found this Monarch butterfly under the leaves.

Ella discovered this white and black butterfly high up on a branch.

A few snapshots I thought the le•top blog readers might like:

Oops! Ella turned the camera the wrong way and took a picture of herself!

Ella loved this blue and orange butterfly.

Lucy, Sloan, and Ella listen with excitement and anticipation as the curator showed a beautiful butterfly to the girls.

I hope you enjoyed Part 1 of my ‘Adventures in Babysitting’!  Part 2 will include my tour of the Sea Life wing of the museum with my very special ‘tour guide’ Ella, and how we learned about under water mammals.

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