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A couple of weeks ago my daughter, Lilah (5 ½ years old), was eating a cracker and told me her bottom tooth was hurting. I took a look and realized that she had her first loose tooth. Over the last couple of weeks I’ve noticed her playing with the tooth more and more. She’s had a difficult time eating things like corn on the cob so I have been cutting it off for her. When I picked Lilah up from school last night the tooth was moving all over the place. I cringed every time I saw it move, but she thought it was the greatest thing. I stepped out into the yard for a few minutes, and when I returned she told me she had pulled out her tooth, and that it “didn’t hurt but there was some blood.” EEWW!

Last night she eagerly placed her tooth in a baggy under her pillow and awaited the gift mom promised from the Tooth Fairy. This morning she ran down the stairs pleased as punch with a five dollar bill. I used the opportunity to reminder her about proper dental care. I explained that she needed to be extra careful to keep her mouth clean so that the new hole from her missing tooth would not get an infection. We have also been discussing that when she gets her new teeth they will have to last her a lifetime.

I’ve included some information below about the baby-to-adult teeth process. I hope this helps ease any fears you may have and equips you with information to prepare your child for this milestone.

When will my child’s baby teeth start falling out and which ones?
Alan Carr, D.M.D. a prosthodonist with the Mayo Clinic said, “A child’s baby teeth (primary teeth) begin to loosen and fall out on their own to make room for permanent teeth at about age 6. Timing can vary, though, and girls generally lose baby teeth earlier than do boys. The last baby teeth typically fall out by age 12 or 13.

Baby teeth usually fall out in the order in which they erupted — first the two bottom front teeth (lower central incisors), followed by the two top front teeth (upper central incisors), the lateral incisors, first molars, canines and second molars. If a child loses a baby tooth early as a result of tooth decay or an accident, a permanent tooth may erupt early and potentially come in crooked due to limited space.”

What if my child in nervous about the process and wants you to take it out?
If your child wants you to pull out a loose tooth, grasp it firmly with a tissue or piece of gauze and remove it with a quick twist. If the tooth is resistant, wait a few days and try again. If you’re concerned about a baby tooth that doesn’t seem to loosen sufficiently on its own, check with your child’s dentist. He or she may recommend a wait-and-see approach or an extraction in the dental office.

When your child starts to lose his or her baby teeth, reinforce the importance of proper dental care. For example:

  • Remind your child to brush his or her teeth at least twice a day. Supervise and help as needed.
  • Help your child floss his or her teeth at bedtime.
  • Limit eating and drinking between meals and at bedtime — especially sugary treats and drinks, such as candy and soda.
  • Schedule regular dental visits for your child, either with your family dentist or a pediatric dentist.
  • Ask the dentist about use of fluoride treatments and dental sealants to help prevent tooth decay.

CHECK OUT LE TOP PLAYWEAR AT
www.letop-usa.com

 

Le Top “Under Construction” Collection Wheel Loader Graphics Box Tee

This green short sleeve cotton tee is perfect for rough-and-tough play. Features ‘look-and-learn’ wheel loader graphics with boy-at-work style. Crafted with cozy cotton that is soft to the touch and made to last through multiple washes where colors stay true and bright. Gentle ribbed collar for easy dressing.

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Vroom! Vroom!  An eraser car is a creative, fun activity children can make as a back to school craft or even on the weekends! Adult supervision will be required, especially for smaller children, to prevent little ones from putting pieces in their mouths. Have fun!

WHAT YOU’LL NEED:

  • Knife (have a parent do this part of the craft)
  • White Glue
  • Thumbtacks
  • Cardboard
  • Permanent Markers

HERE’S HOW TO MAKE IT:

  1. Begin by cutting erasers with a knife (a parent’s job; kids can use scissors for this, but the cuts won’t be as straight).
  2. Stack the erasers to make cars, trucks, and trailers. Pencil-cap erasers and automatic pencil eraser refills make good cargo. Use white glue to hold the pieces together.
  3. To make tires, press thumbtacks into a piece of cardboard, color them with permanent markers, then remove the tacks and press them in place on the vehicles.

CHECK OUT LE TOP BABY AND CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

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It’s another hot, hot, hot day in New York City and I am blasting the air conditioning. I am concerned about our electric bill, but do the best I can to save energy where I can. I remember learning at school as a child how to conserve energy. Teaching kids about saving energy doesn’t have to make them feel like they’re at school. Lecturing them endlessly about turning out the lights when they leave a room will only deter them from actually doing it.

Here are some tips for your kids. 

  • Turn off lights and electronics when you leave a room. Keep doors to unused rooms closed.
  • In summer, use the microwave, crockpot, or toaster oven instead of the stove/oven. When using the stove/oven, keep lids on pots on the stove, match pot to burner size, and don’t preheat the oven for too long.
  • Turn off the water while you brush your teeth. Take five-to-ten minute showers instead of baths.
  • Wash and dry full loads of clothes only. Wash on cool setting. Line dry many items. Do the laundry at night, not in the heat of the day.
  • Don’t hold the refrigerator door open!
  • Change incandescent light bulbs to fluorescent CFL bulbs. If you replace 25 percent of your light bulbs with fluorescents, you can save up to 50 percent on your lighting bill.
  • In summer, close drapes, use fans, and turn thermostat up to 78-80 degrees. In winter, open drapes and turn thermostat down to 68-70 degrees.
  • Consolidate errands and cut out some car usage. Walk, ride your bikes, carpool, or get a scooter.
  • After letting the kids play online energy games, arrange a family pizza night where everyone gets together and has a discussion on what it means to save energy. Ask them what they think of when they hear the word “energy.”
  • Set one night per month to have a “lights out” night, where all lights and electronics are shut off. Light candles or light a fire in your fireplace (if not electric) and pretend to be old-fashioned. Play family board games, read and eat by candlelight, write pen-and-paper letters to friends, or go outside with a blanket for a nighttime picnic and look for shooting stars.

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

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This past weekend there were about 10 kids at my family’s house for the weekend, and for the most part, the screaming, crying and whining was kept to a minimum. I started asking my sister-in-law’s friends what they do to teach their infants and toddlers manners. It’s true — you’ll never get your 2-year-old to chew with her mouth closed. But you might be surprised what she can learn if you focus on conveying the idea of manners, the principle that there are ways to behave and ways not to behave.  In my opinion, the most important is:

THE GOLDEN RULE
We can, however, use kids’ tendencies to help them learn. The Golden Rule – treating others the way you want to be treated – is well applied to basic manners. When kids can see how they can benefit from using manners – both the simple and the more complex – they are more apt to use them.

Here is a list we should all aim for (or at least I want to try for!):

Manner #1
When asking for something, say “Please.” When receiving something, say “Thank you.”

Manner #2
Clean up after yourself. Whether at home or at a friend’s house, always pick up after yourself. It’s their mess, so they need to clean it up. If children leave a mess, then remind them that they need to clean up before the next activity can begin, and stick to it.

Manner #3
Do not interrupt grown-ups who are speaking with each other unless there is an emergency. They will notice you and respond when they are finished talking.

Manner #4
If you do need to get somebody’s attention right away, the phrase “excuse me” is the most polite way for you to enter the conversation

Manner #5
When people ask you how you are, tell them and then ask them how they are.

Manner #6
When you have spent time at your friend’s house, remember to thank his or her parents for having you over and for the good time you had.

Manner #7
Don’t call people mean names.

Manner #8
Cover your mouth when you cough or sneeze, and don’t pick your nose in public.

Manner #9
As you walk through a door, look to see if you can hold it open for someone else.

Manner #10
Use eating utensils properly. If you are unsure how to do so, ask your parents to teach you or watch what adults do.

CHECK OUT LE TOP
CHILDREN AND BABIES’ CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

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I am constantly around new babies – I swear I sneeze and there are 2 new babies in my life from my best friends to cousins to family members. Sometimes it is overhwhelming hearing about all of their “new-mom” or “to-be-mom fears.” It makes me think, what kind of new mom will I be? I did a little research and here are some new mom baby fears and how you can conquer them. J

LEAVING THE HOUSE WITH YOUR NEWBORN

  • Fear: You don’t want to expose him to all sorts of germs. 
  • Re-Think It: Sneezing kids and groping strangers are legitimate concerns, but cabin fever is an even bigger one. You need fresh air and a change of scenery to boost your spirits. Plus, even very young babies benefit from the stimulation of a different environment. 
  • Move Forward: Run errands together, go for strolls, and boldly live your life. But be smart about bugs: Avoid crowds until your child is 3 months old (especially during the winter, when colds and flu are rampant).

MAKING NOISE DURING NAPTIME

  • Fear: Everyone says, “Don’t wake a sleeping baby.” 
  • Re-Think It: Tiptoeing around the house impedes your ability to get things done in those precious free moments, like tidying up or phoning a friend. Ordinary household noise won’t wake most babies, who are used to sounds from the womb. 
  • Move Forward: While it’s certainly not advisable to blast your stereo, break out of your Cone of Silence. If your child is particularly noise-sensitive or tends to awaken prematurely, try turning on a fan. And if you live in a bustling city environment, a white-noise machine can effectively mute street sounds.

PUTTING YOUR INFANT DOWN TO BED WHEN HE/SHE IS CRYING

  • Fear: The last thing you want is to leave her emotionally scarred from your “abandonment” or feel like you are being a “mean Mom.” 
  • Re-Think It: Endlessly rocking and patting your still-wailing baby can heighten up your anxiety, frustration, and exhaustion levels — three things a new mother definitely doesn’t need any more of. What’s even worse: A child who spends almost all of her time in Mommy’s arms may become even fussier when you put her down. Nip it in the bud!! It will become a vicious cycle. 
  • Move Forward: Accept that crying is part of being a healthy baby, not something you always need to stop. Often, it’s your child’s way of soothing his or herself. While it’s fine to soothe your infant for a while, placing her in the crib and leaving the room to take a breather is totally permissible. Just make sure he or she is not in distress.

 SLEEP-TRAINING

  • Fear: No one wants to listen to her child shriek for hours nonstop. 
  • Re-Think It: If a few months of nighttime wakings have left you feeling super tired – now imagine doing it for a year or more! While stumbling into the nursery multiple times a night to help your baby settle down feels like the right thing to do, it’s not: Sleeping through the night and self-soothing are learned skills — and it’s your job to teach them! 
  • Move Forward: By 3 months, your baby is developmentally ready for sleep-training. While you can certainly wait until, say, 7 or 8 months to let her cry it out, keep in mind that the older she gets, the more ingrained her nighttime habits will become. Start by putting your child in her crib, drowsy but still awake.

CHECK OUT LE TOP BABY AND CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

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I was talking to my best friend Kristen yesterday who had a baby boy in February – and she is dying of sleep because it has become really hard to put him down for naps and even to bed at night. She kept pushing on me that when I have a baby, nothing is predictable—except for a shortage of shut-eye!  It’s every parent’s recurring nightmare: you and your baby are super tired, but your baby will not fall asleep.  In the first few months of your baby’s life, getting her to sleep can be a challenge. Newborn babies sleep around 16 hours a day, but due to the need for frequent feedings, these often occur in one- and two-hour stretches at a time. When your baby is 3 months old, sleep time increases up to five-hour intervals, and by 6 months, she may sleep from nine to 12 hours at a time. Mayo Clinic experts point out that regardless of your child’s age, it’s never too soon to learn how to put a baby to sleep in a crib to encourage good sleeping habits.

This post has been moved to our website. To view the full post and specific tips for putting you baby to sleep click on this link: http://blog.letop-usa.com/?p=25614

CHECK OUT LE TOP BABY AND CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

 

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Give sneakers a special and personalized look with this super fun summer craft activity of painting old sneakers!

Fun Tip: Using chalk paint on sneakers is such a cute idea!  This gives kids more options to decorate!

TOOLS:

  • Newspaper

  • Clean canvas sneakers
  • 
Fabric or acrylic craft paint
  • 
Artist paintbrushes
  • 
Fabric paint pens
  • Permanent markers

HERE’S HOW:

1.  Cover a work surface with newspaper.
2.  Using fabric paints and paint pens, decorate sneakers.


3.  Let paint dry for 24 hours before painting another shade on top of the original color. 

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

Chalkboard Paint Sneakers

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