Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for the ‘Crying’ Category

Paulo was put in a timeout while on a playdate. His friend, Amalie, decided to join him for moral support.

I started putting Paulo in timeouts when he was about 12-months old. It seemed so silly to put him in a corner because at his age I didn’t really know if he understood the reason or grasped the concept. According to Dr. Sears, timeouts should be around one minute per year of age. So since he was a year old, he sat in the “naughty corner” for one minute.

The first time I put him in timeout, he sat for about two seconds, then ran back to me with a big smile. I guess he thought it was a game. I couldn’t help but smile back because he was just so darn cute! So just what every mother would do, I swooped him up and showered him with kisses until he giggled.

The subsequent times that followed weren’t “cute” anymore. This time I meant business! Every time he hit his sister, he was sent to the naughty corner. I guess after many timeouts, it finally clicked.  Now at 21-months, he runs up to his sister, hits her, then walks to his corner. (Stinker!) Ok, I guess he learned the wrong lesson, but in his defense, he usually hits his sister if she happens to take away the toy he was playing with.

Read Full Post »

We have decided to extend the contest deadline to next Monday, Dec. 20th!
We are looking for the cutest and “most scared” pictures of your babies and kiddos photographed with Santa!  Submit your pictures until Monday. (A little blurb about the pic would be great too!)

Inspired by our blog posts this month – we want to ring in the holiday season with a few laughs (and smiles) and have a contest on the best “scared of” and “cute” Santa pictures. This Monday, Dec. 20th, we will pick 2 winners – one will be for the cutest Santa picture with your child(ren) and the other will be for the funniest “I’m scared of” Santa photo with your child(ren).

We will choose our winners (at random) who will win a $100 shopping spree from our Le Top online boutique – www.letop-usa.com. The lucky winner will be announced on Monday, December 20th.

So, where to send these photos?
Email service@letop-usa.com
or
Facebook your image with a blurb on our fan page by clicking here: http://www.facebook.com/pages/le-top/117553138255670?ref=sgm

Read Full Post »

For the next two weeks we will be looking for the cutest and “most scared” pictures of your babies and kiddos photographed with Santa!

Inspired by our blog posts from Wednesday and Friday – we want to ring in the holiday season with a few laughs (and smiles) and have a contest on the best “scared of” and “cute” Santa pictures. We know it is only December 3rd, so that’s why we are running this contest for 2 weeks until December 17th to give you enough time to snap your photos. We will pick 2 winners – one will be for the cutest Santa picture with your child(ren) and the other will be for the funniest “I’m scared of” Santa photo with your child(ren). Submit them starting TODAY through December 17th. (A little blurb about the pic would be great too!)

We will choose our winners (at random) who will win a $100 shopping spree from our Le Top online boutique – www.letop-usa.com. The lucky winner will be announced on Friday, December 17th.

So, where to send these photos?

Email service@letop-usa.com
or
Facebook your image with a blurb on our fan page by clicking here:
http://www.facebook.com/pages/le-top/117553138255670?ref=sgm

Read Full Post »

Miranda is wearing a dress and faux fur hat from the 2010 Let It Snow winter collection. Paulo is wearing a shirt from the 2009 Frosty Friends winter collection.

After reading Melissa’s post about kids being scared of Santa, I thought it would be funny to post my kids’ Santa photos this year. There’s something about “crying-babies-with-Santa” pictures that I find so endearing and hilarious. I have one of myself crying, and I have one of my daughter crying. This year, I have one of my son crying. I guess it’s become tradition now. What made this photo moment even more hilarious for me is that Paulo wouldn’t just sit there and cry it out, he actually tried to escape. More than once! Poor Santa. He broke a sweat with my boy. I wonder if Paulo will be on his naughty list.

Read Full Post »

How do you handle a child who is afraid of Santa Claus…or namely sitting on ‘ole Saint Nick’s lap?

It’s a wonderment when I see some parents forcing their child to sit in Santa’s lap…there is something in the holiday commercialism air that changes a parent’s tune of what a child ‘shouldn’t’ be scared of. It’s almost like a right of passage for a child – ha, ha. However, in all reality, it is a big deal for many parents to get the perfect holiday photo with Santa – even if their child is kicking and screaming. So how do you deal with this problem of fearing the jolly red man? Here are some tips if a child refuses:

This post has moved to our website. To view the full post go to: http://blog.letop-usa.com/?p=14342

 

Read Full Post »

No, I did not say that!

When she announced to her children that she was pregnant, her daughter said,

Mommy, I’m going to happy cry!

–Katie, age 6

Editor’s Note:
Please spread the giggles by sharing your funny quotes with us!

Read Full Post »

For most kids, pets are more than just animals, they are members of the family and best friends. My cousin Josh and his family recently lost their first dog due to old age. His name was Magnus and was a huge part of the family, and like a sibling to their 3 (Spencer) and 1 (Gracie) year-old’s lives. Unfortunately, the wonders of owning a pet goes hand-in-hand with the heartbreak of losing one, whether it be because of old age, illness, or an accident, which can be very difficult.

Magnus and Grace

Pets are often the first to greet kids in the morning or after school. Many times pets may be the one your child looks to for comfort and companionship when ill or feeling unpopular or upset. It is natural to want to protect children from painful experiences, but any parent can help them cope with it. Many times, a pet’s death might be their first time losing a loved one for a child.

I had a dog growing up named Piglet. Yea, strange name, but she was a sharpei (the really wrinkly dogs) and kinda funny looking, but a loyal and loving dog. She actually used to be a “model” in many of our old Le Top campaigns! What I did learn from coping with her loss was that parents are the best judge of how much information a child can handle about death and the loss of their pet. My mom was honest and told me Piglet had cancer – it was tough, but I am glad she didn’t’ lie. Don’t underestimate children. You may find that, by being honest with your kid about your pet’s loss, you may be able to address some fears and misperceptions they have about death.

Here are some tips on how to tell your child:

1.   Share the News
One of the most difficult parts about losing a pet may be breaking the bad news to kids. Try to do so one-on-one in a place where they feel safe and comfortable and not easily distracted.  Try to gauge how much information kids need to hear based on their age, maturity level, and life experience. If your pet is very old or has a lingering illness, consider talking to kids before the death occurs. If you have to euthanize your pet, you may want to explain that the veterinarians have done everything that they can your pet would never get better this is the kindest way to take the pet’s pain away the pet will die peacefully, without feeling hurt or scared. It’s OK to use words like “death” and “dying.” Be brief, and let your child’s questions guide how much information you provide.

2.    Tell ‘em the Truth
Avoid trying to gloss over the event with a lie. Telling a child that “Rover ran away” or “Maestro went on a trip” is not a good idea. It probably won’t alleviate the sadness about losing the pet.

3.    Helping Your Child Cope
Don’t feel compelled to hide your own sadness about losing a pet. Showing how you feel and talking about it openly sets an example for kids. When my cousin’s little boy, Spencer, first learned that Magnus died, he was angry, but then learned to accept the loss of his pet. My cousin later cried from missing Magnus, but also seeing his children hurt.  Spencer went up to my cousin Josh and said, “It’s okay daddy.” Seeing Spencer learn from Josh was an example of how showing your child your own feelings sometimes helps them cope too.

Like anyone dealing with a loss, kids usually feel a variety of emotions, and might experience loneliness, anger, frustration that the pet couldn’t get better, or guilt about times that they were mean to or didn’t care for the pet as promised. Help kids understand that it’s natural to feel all of those emotions, that it’s OK to not want to talk about them at first, and that you’re there when they are ready to talk.

4. Moving On
After the shock of the news has faded, it’s important to help your child heal and move on. Help your kids find special ways to remember a pet. You might have a ceremony to bury your pet or just share memories of fun times you had together. Write a prayer together or offer thoughts on what the pet meant to each family member. Share stories of your pet’s funny moments or escapades. Most importantly, talk about your pet with love and affection often. Let your child know that while the pain will go away, but happy memories are forever.

This post is dedicated to my cousin Josh and his loving pup Magnus. He lived a long, drooly and loving life.

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »