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Archive for June, 2012

When Leah from N’Tended for Kids in Lynchburg, VA sent us photos of her delightful daughters, we jumped at the chance to use them as our Le Top Darlings of the Day. It just doesn’t get better than this. Not one but three beautiful little girls in our adorable summer fashions. Grace (3-years-old) and her twin sisters, Lila and Addison (8-months-old) are making the most of their summer by frequenting the beach in their Le Top “Love Bug” pinafore (top) and “Catch a Wave” (middle) bathing suits, and Le Top “Sun and Sea” cross-back jumpsuits (bottom).

We’re told that Grace loves clothes and shoes! She dresses herself in the morning and then wants her sisters’ outfits to be coordinated with hers. Aawwe!! The twins think that Grace is an amazing and absolutely hilarious big sister. They laugh at any and everything she says. Grace’s personal fave-collecting shells on the beach. Though the twins are not so thrilled with the sand they do love strolling on the beach.

Congratulations Grace, Lila and Addi on your Le Top Darling of the Day title!!!!

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No sooner do you lift your toddler out of the car, set him down on the sidewalk, and turn to wrestle his stroller out of the trunk than he suddenly darts away. I think most moms tend to stay fit at this age because they are constantly running after their child.

Children ages 1 to 3 tend to be impulsive, so you cannot expect your teachings to ensure that your toddler always will do what is best for her. Toddlers who wander or run away for any reason are at risk and need the adults in their lives to protect them. For example, because of their small size and limited traffic experience, toddlers suffer the greatest number of pedestrian injuries, according to the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control.

What are steps to keep young children safe, while allowing them freedom to grow and explore? See below.

Why Toddlers Run Away
Most children begin to walk, talk, socialize and solve problems during the toddler years. Toddlers naturally are inclined to discover and experiment with independence. However, they are not yet able to determine what is safe and have not learned to stop and think about consequences. Curiosity and lack of impulse control lead some toddlers to test their new freedom by running away, while others might wander off to look at something interesting.

Stay close to him.
If you’re in a safe, open space where you can see your toddler and he can see you, it’s okay to let him run ahead of you. Most of the time, if you don’t yell or run after him, he’ll stop on his own, turn around to see your reaction, and run back to you when he sees you’re not coming after him. But don’t take any chances if you’re in a crowded area or around cars.

Set Limits, Follow Though
Tell your toddler how you expect him to behave before you begin an errand. But make sure you really spell it out for him. Instead of saying, “Can you be a big boy and hold my hand?” say, “Remember, you need to hold my hand when we’re in the mall.” Expressions like ‘big boy’ often backfire. Toddlers turn around and say, ‘I don’t want to be a big boy!'”

Parents must make clear to toddlers that there are consequences for running away or being wild in public. Tell your child ahead of time that if she cannot stay close or hold you hand, then she must ride in her stroller for a while. Explain that when she is calm and ready to hold your hand while walking beside you, she will be allowed to get out of the stroller and try again. If she tries to run away again, put her back in the stroller and do not waiver, even if she has a tantrum.

Give Specific Warnings
Young kids often forget safety expectations midway through an outing and take off. Instead of simply shouting “Stop!” (which is actually a very abstract concept for a toddler, who has to figure out what it is he’s supposed to stop doing), give a concrete command identifying a specific body part or movement — such as “Thomas, stop your feet!” or “Stay on the grass!”  Once you’ve got your kid by the hand again, reiterate the rules.

Distract and Divert
Young children may not remember their parents’ rules and expectations while on an outing, and they might suddenly run off. Instead of chasing a runaway toddler, call his name or say a familiar word or concrete phrase that will stop and distract him. Give him a hug for coming back to your side.

Make Errands Fun
Singing, rhyming, dancing, marching or jumping can encourage toddlers to stay near you while going from one place to another. To focus her attention while out in public, engage your child by playing simple games, asking her to copy your funny movements, saying silly words to each other or playing “Can You See What I See?”

Encourage him when he does well.
When he resists the urge to run wild, reinforce his good behavior by telling him what he did well. But again, be specific. “It’s not enough to say, ‘You behaved like such a big boy today.” Encourage his actions by saying them back to him. Say, ‘I really appreciated that when I called you, you came back to me.'”

Toddlers as Helpers
Toddlers often try to run away because they are bored. Tell your child you need her help picking out groceries, returning library books or taking your dog to the veterinarian. Most toddlers love to help, so give your child a specific job and she will be less likely to wander.

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com 

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Thanks to this uber-patriotic craft, you kiddos won’t have to wait until dark to see July Fourth fireworks! It’s fun and is sure to create a sparkle in your child’s eye. 🙂

TIME NEEDED:
30 minutes or less

MATERIALS:

  • Dark Blue Paper
  • Glitter (any color you want…red, white and blue?)
  • White Elmer’s Glue

INSTRUCTIONS:

  1. Use white glue to draw firework bursts on a sheet of dark blue paper.
  2. Pour glitter onto the wet glue, then tap any loose glitter onto a clean sheet of paper and return the excess to the jar.

TIPS: For multiple colors, draw and sprinkle each firework shape separately.

 

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S
PLAYWEAR THAT IS JUST PERFECT
FOR INDEPENDENCE DAY AT
www.letop-usa.com

 

Le Top Whales & Sails Nautical Striped Shirt & Canvas Board Shorts

Put some wind in his sails with this sweet nautical white and azure striped short sleeve tee and navy canvas pocketed board shorts that match swimmingly! Sailing ship appliqué with circular boat window vents keep him cool in warm weather. Soft rib neckline and elasticized waist for easy over-the-head and pull up dressing.

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We are looking for models for our upcoming photo shoot. If you think your child may have what it takes bring them to our go-see. Click on the flyer for a larger version.

CHECK OUT OUR WEBSITES BY CLICKING ON THE LINKS BELOW!

www.letop-usa.com
www.rabbitmoon-usa.com

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Sh*t! How do I keep my kid from swearing? It happens. We’ve all heard it at some point from a friend’s child, your own toddler who is imitating you, or even from family members who think its funny to make other parents’ child say “frog” which sounds like you know what. Ha. But in all seriousness…how do you get your children ages 2 to 12 to stop cursing?!?

Is your toddler discovering the “power” of language? Amazingly, it doesn’t take kids long to figure out the really important words. Your wonderfully curious toddler has acquired a new and exciting skill. Many times, a child’s first swear word will be the result of direct mimicry; maybe she heard you say it when another driver cut you off in traffic, and now she’s repeating it endlessly in the back seat.

According to Care.com in a national survey, “Eighty-six percent of parents agree that children ages 2 to 12 are cursing more today than when they themselves were children. Fifty-four percent of parents say that their child has cursed in front of them, though 20 percent don’t think the child understood the meaning of the word.”

At its best, swearing is an ineloquent way to express emotions. At its worst, it actually stunts one’s ability to describe emotional experiences. So whether a child hears these f-bombs from you, at school or on TV, it’s important to stop it before it continues.

Here are some tips to help you respond if your child swears:

  • Keep a poker face. The first time your toddler says a swear word or makes a scatological reference, restrain your urge to laugh out loud, which your child would of course take as wonderful reinforcement for doing it again.
  • Watch your own mouth. Sure, there are different rules for adults’ and children’s behavior, but if your toddler hears profanity dropped into daily conversation, it’s going to be a lot harder to convince her that certain words are unacceptable.
  • No matter what age your child is, address it immediately and calmly. For kids age 6 and under, start simple: “No swearing ever.”
  • For older kids, who can think more abstractly, you should explain why swearing is not okay. Your goal is to make sure to help kids express their feelings, to talk and present themselves in the best way.
  • Some parents believe that calling attention to a child’s inappropriate words will only encourage the behavior, so they choose to ignore these transgressions. But how will your child learn that cursing is not okay if you don’t teach him? Ask your child first whether he or she understands the word. If the answer is “no,” explain that the word is offensive, that it affects how others receive you, and that it is not acceptable.
  • When you reprimand your child, he or she might retort, “But I heard you/Daddy say it.” Resist the urge to deny or justify your own swearing. Admit that you also struggle to control what you say. By doing so you won’t create a double standard.
  • Sit down with your child and brainstorm new, non-offensive words or phrases to say when she feels frustrated, upset, or angry. More often than not, children say these words when name-calling. Use this incident to discuss your child’s feelings toward an acquaintance or sibling.
  • If your child has already made a habit of swearing, you need stronger measures to show him that this behavior is not appropriate. Tell him that every time he swears at home, there will be consequences such as no book at bedtime, no video games, no TV, no dessert after dinner (you get the point).
  • Beware of TV and movies – kids do catch every word!

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

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Looking for popsicle recipes for kids? Want something that’s a little different? Just needing a treat to cool off in the hot weather? Here are a few fantastic popsicle recipes for kids and adults.

This has been moved to our website. To view the full post go to:

http://blog.letop-usa.com/?p=25274

CHECK OUT LE TOP PLAYWEAR
AND SWIMWEAR AT

www.letop-usa.com

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Henry S. Dziekan III/Getty

On Tuesday June 19th, model and actress Molly Sims (39) delivered a bouncing baby boy. Though she’s not sharing his name yet she couldn’t help but put a post on her website titled “The Happiest Day of My Life”.

“It is with such absolute pride and pure joy that we welcome baby Stuber into our lives. He weighs in at just over 7 lbs., and I could just eat him up he’s so sweet!”

We think baby Stuber would look adorable in the Le Top Baby “Animal Crackers” Collection” Striped Coverall.

This is the first child for Sims and husband Scott Stuber. Congrats!



Go wild over this adorable light blue and white striped long sleeve coverall crafted with gentle cotton for exceptional comfort. Navy ribbed trims and cross-stitch embroidered giraffe, bear and elephant and mini backside pocket add classic style. Asymmetrical front shoulder buttons and underneath snaps assist dressing.

 

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