Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for June, 2011


Here in New York it is SO HUMID – I tried to explain this to my niece and was having trouble. I know that New York City isn’t the only place it gets humid. I used to live in San Diego and it would be humid there or even in parts of the mid-west. Here is a mini explanation to tell your little one.

This post has been moved to our website. To view the full post go to: http://blog.letop-usa.com/?p=19163

 

Read Full Post »


Who here grew up playing in a portable pool at Grandma’s house? Raise a hand? I did! I personally grew up with a pool in my backyard, but remember as a child going to play at friends’ houses or Grandma’s house where there would be a portable pool to make the warm weather heat of summer a little bit more bearable. I live in New York now and even my nieces play in a portable pool on a city roofdeck because pools are scarce in the city…what was really shocking to find out this week was a new study that suggests portable or inflatable swimming pools are a greater danger to children than many parents likely realize, leading to one death every five days in the United States during warm months. The study, published in the journal Pediatrics, provides harrowing descriptions of 209 backyard drownings and 35 near-drownings that have occurred in portable pools from 2001 to 2009. Scarily, I found out this study is the first U.S. research to probe the role portable pools have played in deaths or near-drownings.

Researchers restricted their study to include wading pools less than 45 centimeters deep to inflatable and soft-sided pools measuring about one meter deep.

The study, published Monday, June 20, 2011 in the journal Pediatrics, found that 209 children died in these pools between 2001 and 2009. In addition, there were 35 near-drownings reported during the same time period. The researchers reported on accidents that occurred in water depths ranging from two inches to four feet. One accident involved a parent who fell asleep in a wading pool while holding a child. Other accidents occurred during lapses in pool supervision when a parent left to answer the phone or was distracted by yard work. Two 9-year-old girls drowned in an inflatable pool after becoming entangled in a pool cover. In another case, 3-year-old twins died after leaving their home undetected and jumping into a neighbor’s unsecured four-foot-deep portable pool.

According to the study, 94 per cent of children were under age five and 56 per cent of the victims were boys. The children were also more likely to be in their own yard when the incident happened, with 73 per cent of incidents taking place there.

In this Aug. 7, 2007 file photo, Todd Fuentes, 4, left, plays with Adrian Girald, 7, second from right, and Anthony Zollinger, second from left, as his father Eugene Fuentes, right, looks on in a portable pool in Brooklyn, New York. (AP Photo/Frank Franklin II)

“The anecdotal evidence was suggesting that because portable pools are readily available in many convenience stores and malls, and they’re relatively cheap, parents would pick them up, take them home, quickly assemble them, and all this would be done without a lot of forethought about the safety aspects,” said senior author, Dr. Gary A. Smith, director of the Center for Injury Research and Policy at Nationwide Children’s Hospital in Columbus.

Why is there a trend in buying portable pools?
Portable pools have become a popular and affordable alternative to expensive in-ground pools or stationary above-ground pools. Unlike the fragile, inflatable pools of the past, portable pools today are sturdy and large, including some that can be filled with as much as water as a small in-ground pool. Large wading pools typically cost $100 or less, whereas very large portable pools can cost $1,000 or less. By comparison, in-ground pools can cost $30,000 or more.

The downside of portable pools?
The downside of portable pools is that they often lack the security fences and gates that most local zoning authorities typically require to surround in-ground and above-ground pools. Among the portable pool drownings that were reviewed by the Pediatrics study, at least 47 could have been prevented if the pool had been surrounded by fencing.

The researchers acknowledge that no single strategy can completely prevent a death or near drowning, and so advocate a multi-pronged approach. On the one hand, manufacturers should develop affordable safety devices for portable pools, including fencing, alarms and safety covers, which are common for in-ground pools. They also say better consumer-education programs are needed to make parents aware of the pools’ risks.

According to the study, children were under adult supervision in only 43 per cent of the cases.

In-ground pools must have fencing on all four sides, while portable pools can be put anywhere on a property, she said. In my opinion, many consumers assume such pools are safer because of their smaller size and that there is only a couple of inches of water, so it’s not that big of a worry. Portable pools can be extremely dangers and should be treated the same way parents see larger built-in backyard pools with the same importance of adult supervision.

“The thing about drowning is that it’s simply different than most other types of injuries, because if you fall from playground equipment, you usually get another chance,” he said. “With drowning, it’s quick, it’s silent and it’s final. That’s why it’s so important to prevent these events from occurring in the first place,” say Dr. Smith.

Note: Researchers obtained data for this study from the four U.S Consumer Product Safety Commission data banks: the Death Certificate file, the Injury/Potential Injury Incident file, the In-Depth Investigation file, and the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System.

Bottom line mommies and daddies? If you are going to use a portable or inflatable pool – you must be vigilant the entire time, never leave your child unattended and treat it as if it were an actual pool in your backyard. What’s an alternative? I loved sprinklers in the grass as a kid – shockingly they are really fun and kids always find a way to make a game or two of it in the summer heat!

Read Full Post »


This gorgeous little buttercup, Tess (almost 9- months old), has been called “the happiest baby in the world”. Her favorite past-time is waving at everyone and saying “hi!” I’m sure she gets tons of smiles and waves in return.

She is the first grandchild and great-grandchild on both sides of her family. Wow! Her Grandmother loves to send her Le Top clothing including this one from a past spring  “Strawberry Fields” collection. Thank you grandma!

We are pleased to crown Tess the Le Top Darling of the Day!

Read Full Post »


I grew up with a Sharpei breed dog and her name was Piglet. I feel like every family is like the Disney’s 101 Dalmations and every family tends to find pets that fit their personality. We have some fabulous Le Top collections coming up from our pre-fall collection that are called “A Walk in the Park” that are so cute for kids who love dogs! Some doctors suggest that it’s ideal to bring home your family’s furry friend when your child is 5 or 6; at this age kids fully comprehend that pets are living creatures and not moving stuffed animals.

In a study of 5-year-olds at Purdue University, more than 40 percent said they turn to their pet when they feel sad, angry, or have a secret to share. The study also found that 5- and 6-year-old pet owners expressed more empathy to their peers than those who don’t have an animal around the house.

Here are some tips on how to pick your perfect pet!

1.  It’s All About Space
Where you live should be a factor in the type of pet you choose. In general, the bigger the pet, the more space it needs. If you live in a small space, look for smaller animals like a hamster, a cat, or a smaller breed of dog such as a Jack Russel Terrier. If you have a lot of extra room, a larger animal such as a Rottweiler may be a possibility for you. Fish are a good choice for most spaces as long as you take into consideration the fact that the fish will grow and may need a large tank.

CHECK OUT LE TOP CHILDREN’S CLOTHING AT
www.letop-usa.com

2.  Family Dynamics
If you have children, you should take their ages into account when you are choosing a family pet. Younger children are generally more compatible with animals they don’t play with, such as fish. Older children can learn to handle and take responsibility for most pets. Another consideration is your child’s activity level. A puppy may be better suited to a house with an active child, while an older dog will be better suited to a family with a calmer child.

3.  The Time Factor
Your family’s schedule should be a big consideration when you are choosing a family pet. Fish, reptiles such as snakes, amphibians such as frogs, and small animals such as hamsters are good for a family that is rarely home or that doesn’t want to have to walk an animal. Birds are good for a family that is home often but doesn’t want to walk an animal. Dogs and cats are good pets for a family that is home a lot and that want a real companion that needs attention and training.

4.  Care Considerations
Every pet will need some type of care. Take into consideration the amount of time and money you are willing to spend on your pet. Also, consider food, bedding, accessories, veterinary bills and housing needs. The amount of time you will spend cleaning up after your pet is something you should also think about.

5.  Pet Allergies?
Some pets have dander and fur such as cats, dogs and birds. My fiancé has a Labradoodle (a Labrador dog and Poodle mixed) that is hypoallergenic and doesn’t shed which is great for kids with allergies! If anyone in your family has allergies, take their allergies into consideration when you are choosing a family pet. Think about any bedding that the pet might need since some people are allergic to certain types of trees and grasses. Some pets need a substrate made of pine shavings or moss. Pets that will spend time outside may bring in dust and pollen, which are both allergens.

Good luck in your pet hunt!

Read Full Post »

I started eating sushi when I was a toddler – yes, I am half Chinese, so perhaps the concept of rice that I was accustomed to made sushi more appealing, but I do remember LOVING tuna!! Especially dousing it in soy sauce (not so healthy – ha!). Many parents are skeptical about sushi because of the mercury content in tuna and other fish, but as long as it is in moderation and from a safe/clean restaurant or from a clean grocery store that sells “sushi grade” tuna, I think you and your children are fine. The Environmental Protection Agency reports that fish and shellfish under 12 oz. per week are an important part of a healthy diet for children and pregnant or nursing women. I see sushi as a great way to incorporate a more international diet palate for your child, and also can be quite healthy!

19% of all children are classified as obese, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. It seems as though children are always hungry, but turn their noses up at healthier food and opt for greasy (French fries / burgers / chicken tenders) or sugary foods instead. Not quite ready to give your kids raw fish? You can always use cooked food such as shrimp tempura or even making sandwiches look like sushi!

Disguising healthy foods by using fun ways of making nutritious snacks for children can take the focus on the ingredients and make healthy snacking an interesting part of your child’s day.

Sandwich Sushi
Sandwiches can be made nutritious with whole wheat bread and lean meat ingredients, but they might not always be attractive to children who’d rather have a peanut butter and jelly on white. Making sandwiches into sushi shapes and allowing kids to eat with chopsticks make it more fun. Make your sandwiches with ingredients that can be easily rolled, including meat and cheese. Then, flatten the sandwich and roll tightly. Slice the roll into half-inch thick pieces and offer with chopsticks.

Snack Art
Cut up a variety of foods, such as fruits, vegetables, cheese and lean meat, into bite-sized squares, triangles and circles. Have your child wash her hands, and then set out a clean plate for her to make nutritious snack art using the shapes available. She’ll be enjoying making faces and pictures so much that she’ll hardly even notice as she pops a few pieces into her mouth for sampling. Once the picture is done, challenge her to eat everything on her plate.

Read Full Post »

No, I did not say that!

(Little Sister), be quiet. It’s hard to love you when you are so loud.”

– Austin, age 4

Editor’s Note:
Please spread the giggles by sharing your funny quotes with us!

Read Full Post »

Le Top "Heart's Delight" Swimsuit

I spend most of my weekends in the summer by the pool in the Hamptons and typically it is Bob Marley’s greatest hits on repeat. I love music, and especially a variety of music, but I know it can be tough if you have a big family for everyone to agree upon the music, and especially for it to be appropriate for the kids too!

20 Songs for your Summer Jam Playlist from Le Top:

  1. “Pressure Drop” – Toots & The Maytals
  2. “Crazy (Singer Version)” – Gnarls Barkley
  3. “Dog Days Are Over” – Florence and The Machine
  4. “Rock Lobster” – B 52s
  5. “California Girls” – The Beach Boys
  6. “Steal My Kisses” – Ben Harper
  7. “No Rain” – Blind Melon
  8. “Could You Be Loved” – Bob Marley
  9. “Dancing in the Moonlight” – King Harvest
  10. “Under the Boardwalk” – The Drifters
  11. “Build me Up Buttercup” – The Foundations
  12. “Viva La Vida” – Coldplay
  13. “Take it Easy” – Eagles
  14. “Over My Head” – The Fray
  15. “Coconut” – Harry Nilsson
  16. “Wasting Time” – Jack Johnson
  17. “I Want You Back” – Jackson 5
  18. “Carolina in My Mind” – James Taylor
  19. “Margaritaville” – Jimmy Buffet
  20. “Sunday Morning” – Maroon 5

 What are some of your favorites? Enjoy and boogie down at the pool!

Read Full Post »

« Newer Posts - Older Posts »